A total of $350 million to $420 million of Angolan diamonds were smuggled into neighbouring countries in 2000. This figure represents about half of Angola`s annual production and 5% of the world`s annual rough diamond sales In December 2000, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution A/RES/55/56, which supports the establishment of an international certification scheme for rough diamonds[13], followed by the support of the United Nations Security Council in its resolution 1459 adopted in January 2003. Since then, every year, the General Assembly has renewed its support for the CP, the last of which was in March 2018. [14] On January 18, 2001, President Bill Clinton issued Executive Order 13194 prohibiting the import of rough diamonds from Sierra Leone into the United States, in accordance with UN resolutions. [52] On May 22, 2001, President George W. [25] Another recent statistic from Statistic Brain showed that Sierra Leone was the second highest production of conflict diamonds, ranked as 1% of global production, after Angola, which produced 2.1% in 2016. 15% of diamond production in Sierra Leone are conflict diamonds. It shows that conflict diamond production still exists in Sierra Leone. [26] « I don`t think we`ll have a problem, » said Kennedy Hamutenya, the Namibian chief negotiator at Gaborone.

« The WTO should be able to give us the green light. » U.S. chief negotiator Alan Eastham agreed that free trade issues need to be addressed, but that the problem is unlikely to compromise certification efforts. . . .